FrighteninglyGoodRead · Uncategorized

Frighteningly Good Reads #5: The Ghost Knight by Cornelia Funke

This book is perfect for readers out there who want to enjoy the spooks and specters of the haunting season without the scare. Cornelia Funke, writer of the wonderful Inkheart series, has written a number of other books I have enjoyed but Ghost Knight has the perfect feel for Frighteningly Good Reads.

Eleven-year-old Jon Whitcroft never expected to enjoy boarding school. Then again, he never expected to be confronted by a pack of vengeful ghosts, either. And then he meets Ella, a quirky new friend with a taste for adventure…

Together, Jon and Ella must work to uncover the secrets of a centuries-old murder while being haunted by terrifying spirits, their bloodless faces set on revenge. So when Jon summons the ghost of the late knight Longspee for his protection, there’s just one question: Can Longspee truly be trusted? Goodreads.

ghostknightI’ll admit, In the beginning I didn’t care for Jon at all. His Dad died when he was four and he fears that his mother and little sisters have become too attached to the man she is dating, “The Beard.” Instead of talking about it with his Mother he has taken the petulant stance that only a pre-teen has the energy to maintain. His assumes his Mother sending him to boarding school is his punishment and that The Beard is only vying to get rid of him. This sullen attitude is slapped right out of him when he starts seeing ghosts at his new school. Ella, the beautiful Ella, not only believes him but she can see ghosts too. With a new friend to confide in Jon begins to discover what all children must: talking about your fears is how you overcome them. But will talking be enough with the Knight? Or is it all a trap? How can we tell who to trust?

The level of scary of this book falls far below Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone with a smattering of Knightly violence that adds to the action. The characters, their friendship, and their collective adventures are a beautiful foil for the individual development of Jon himself. By the end of the book, my grudging acceptance of the little twerp had grown to genuine admiration.

If you want a lighter fare or need a recommendation for a younger reader this is a perfect book to curl up with during the month of October!


Tell me, please!

What is your favorite fun ghost story?


 

FrighteninglyGoodRead · Uncategorized

Frighteningly Good Reads: Social Sunday

The whole purpose of Frighteningly Good Reads is to extend and enjoy the gorgeous month that is October. It is my favorite month culminating in my favorite holiday of all: Halloween! I am thrilled that other bloggers are joining me this year and so on Sunday this year I want to highlight all their amazing blogs and any other fantastic books I have found through other blogs during the week.


Muse With Me

I have been reading and following Ryan’s blog nearly as long as I have been writing mine. Ryan reads truly terrifying books and fantastic graphic novels and comic books. If you are looking for scarier fare than you are seeing here, Muse With Me is a great place to go. Here is Ryan’s reading list for this years FGR.


What’s NonFiction?

I haven’t always been a great reader of nonfiction but, when I started regularly blogging, I wanted to pay more attention to this fabulous genre. But, I will never be as good at covering nonfiction as What’s Nonfiction? I’m not even going to try! This glorious site is full of amazing nonfiction selections that I really never see anywhere else. For example, look at the amazing spooky nonfiction books featured last year at this post. Or, check out a more recent post on the sociology of the science of fear here.


The Writerly Way

I want to know where Sammie at The Writerly Way is shopping because this blog is always packed full of books I have never seen before but I simply must read. I am so thrilled that Sammie is participating in Frightening Good Reads because everything on The Writerly Way awesome ! It is on this blog that I found out about In the Hall with the Knife and anyone who gets as excited about a YA books based on the movie Clue is my kind of people. Just a stroll through this blog’s 2019 reviews will give anyone lots to add to their TBR.


Tell me, please!

Have you read anything spooky this weekend?


 

FrighteninglyGoodRead · Middle Grade · Uncategorized

Frighteningly Good Reads #3: The Witches by Roald Dahl

“My darling…you won’t last long in this world if you don’t know how to spot a witch when you see one.”

This is not a fairy-tale. This is about real witches. Real witches don’t ride around on broomsticks. They don’t even wear black cloaks and hats. They are vile, cunning, detestable creatures who disguise themselves as nice, ordinary ladies. So how can you tell when you’re face to face with one? Well, if you don’t know yet you’d better find out quickly-because there’s nothing a witch loathes quite as much as children and she’ll wield all kinds of terrifying powers to get rid of them. Goodreads.

thewitchesI read this book as a child and I have re-read it several times since then. It is my go-to recommendation for middle grade spooky reads. The reasons are simple. A nameless boy and his nameless Gramamama fight evil with two simple skills: communication and observation. Just the ability to look around and see what’s happening and talk to an adult about your concerns. In addition, even though the child’s parents are killed (can’t kids go on adventures with their parents?) the Grandmama actually listens to her grandson. It may seem silly but think about it, how many children’s books have you read where the underlying theme is, “parents just don’t understand”? Around the world there are children who talk to and are listened to by adults in their lives. But, somehow, in fiction our under-age protagonists are usually saddled with parents who don’t believe them in addition to their bigger problem. I love this book for the simple fact that it showcases an adult and a child working together.

Also, neither Grandmama nor the Grandson have any super powers. The Grandson isn’t gifted with super intelligence either. They are just regular people working together to thwart evil.

And the evil? It looks like a regular adult. The world is frequently terrifying to kids today. They know, or are taught, that there is evil everywhere in the world. But, if you know how to spot it you can stay safe.

This book is not perfect. It is a rare book that can claim that title. I will admit, I vastly preferred the ending in the movie to the one in the book (sacrilege, I know!). And, certainly, Dahl has been accused of darker motives.

But, The Witches is still one of my favorite Frighteningly Good Reads and one I highly recommend. The scary and macabre tone has an underpinning of the importance of listening to each other. And, one day, I hope I am the kind of Grandmama that makes a cup of cocoa, sits down and says,

“Tell me everything.”


Tell me, please!

Do you have a favorite Roald Dahl book?


 

FrighteninglyGoodRead · Uncategorized

Frighteningly Good Read #2:

illuminaeThis may not be a stock “scary book” but I will confess: being trapped on a spaceship or a submarine is a nightmare situation for me. Add any kind of threat and I am at panic level of terror. Usually I pass right by all books set it such a situation but The Illuminae Files by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff came so highly recommended by everyone that I gathered my courage to read it.

I had the pleasure of reading and listening to the audiobook and I can not imagine experiencing this story any other way. Since the audiobook is a full cast recording, a delightful one at that, it is almost like watching a movie. The experience is so vivid.

And the design of this book is beyond comprehension. A simple flip-through might give a reader the impression that it is a series of e-mails and documents but it is a multi-faceted thing that is probably best described as a printed collage. I loved it. It was, at times, confusing, but overall it essential to experiencing the full effect of the story.

As for the story:

This morning, Kady thought breaking up with Ezra was the hardest thing she’d have to do. This afternoon, her planet was invaded.

The year is 2575, and two rival megacorporations are at war over a planet that’s little more than an ice-covered speck at the edge of the universe. Too bad nobody thought to warn the people living on it. With enemy fire raining down on them, Kady and Ezra—who are barely even talking to each other—are forced to fight their way onto an evacuating fleet, with an enemy warship in hot pursuit.

But their problems are just getting started. A deadly plague has broken out and is mutating, with terrifying results; the fleet’s AI, which should be protecting them, may actually be their enemy; and nobody in charge will say what’s really going on. As Kady hacks into a tangled web of data to find the truth, it’s clear only one person can help her bring it all to light: the ex-boyfriend she swore she’d never speak to again.

BRIEFING NOTE: Told through a fascinating dossier of hacked documents—including emails, schematics, military files, IMs, medical reports, interviews, and more—Illuminae is the first book in a heart-stopping, high-octane trilogy about lives interrupted, the price of truth, and the courage of everyday heroes. Goodreads

I may have said that being aboard a spaceship or submarine is a nightmare but a deadly plague on said sealed metal crafts trumps that in the order of terrifying. And when the delightful Kady and cutie Ezra are threatened my heart was in my throat.

I well and truly cannot decide which character enjoyed more – Kady or Ezra. Both are quick and witty and strong in the face of adversity. Furthermore, the AI is a creature of fascination for me. I just wanted to spend more time with them all. Thankfully, there are two more books in the series for me!


Tell me, please!

What non-traditional setting terrifies you?


 

Fantasy · fiction · SeriousSeriesLove · Uncategorized

September Sequel: Queen of the Tearling Trilogy by Erika Johansen

This series…..wow. I cannot stop thinking about it. I first read The Queen of the Tearling in 2017 and shortly after that purchased and read the second book The Invasion of the Tearling. I immediately purchased The Fate of the Tearling and put it carefully on my shelf where it has sat for nearly two years. Thanks to September Sequels I finally made time to finish the series. I am going to try and make this as spoiler free as possible so forgive me for all the vagueness that follows.

I only partially remember the details of the first two books and I was concerned that I had them woven facts with another series that I read at the same time. So, I actually took the time to re-read the first two books. I tore through them. It helps that I am post-move and pre-work so I have nothing but time to read right now. Still, these books consumed me for the past few days.

The Queen of the Tearling jacket reads:

With the arrival of her nineteenth birthday, Princess Kelsea Raleigh Glynn is ascending to her rightful place as the new Queen of the Tearling. Surrounded by enemies, including an evil sorceress possessed of dark magic, the young ruler stands little chance of success. But Kelsea possesses fearsome weapons of her own, including the Tear sapphire, a jewel of immense power and magic. As an epic war draws near, Kelsea’s quest to save her kingdom and meet her destiny begins – a wondrous journey of self-discovery and a trial by fire that will make her a legend…if she can survive.

Do you want to know something odd? The first time I read this book I pictured Kelsea as being age 12-14. It is no spoiler to say that she was raised in isolation, hidden from enemies, by two caretakers. This made her seem both very young while simultaneously wise. It was only upon reading it the second time that I caught that she was nineteen. This fact made other things in the series, like her distraction regarding the attractiveness of her guard, seem less weird.

Re-reading the first two books was a joy. They are fairly fast-paced (bit of a Hobbit-like traveling part in the beginning of book one) with fantastic characters. All three books are told from shifting narratives and you can see the perspective of each character clearly. And the characters! Kelsea has a core made of pure iron.  Her guards, the evil Queen, the mysterious Lily, and Father Tyler – I loved (or loathed) them all. Two of the guards, The Mace and Pen were my absolute favorites and I relished each scene they were in. I want the Mace to be my friend in real life. Or, at least, have one friend as utterly dedicated to me as the Mace is to Kelsea. I was ready for the next book. I needed to know the fate of this world that had become to important and so real to me.

Let me just disclose that one of the reasons this book landed on my TBR shelf for so long was because it did not go over well with the fans of the first two books. So, I was worried. For the first 50-75% of the book, it was amazing. Every thought was, “what are people complaining about?” Then, stuff happened. Nothing that requires trigger warnings or anything (although, please note that there is some background sexual violence in this book) Then, I got to the final quarter of the book.

The ending left me open-mouthed staring at the back cover.

I went full large-mouthed bass.

It is not a bad ending exactly. On a scale of endings it is closer to Hunger Games than say, Divergent. There is sadness, there is wonder, and there are a few, “whaaaaaaaat?” moments mixed in. Mostly, it is just a perfect series with an ending that is probably perfect for the series but isn’t what I wanted. This is the ending that makes me finally understand why people write fan fiction. I would like a go at re-writing this ending.

I will still highly recommend the entire series. It is fantasy writing in a surprising way and is packed full of fantastic characters charging through life righting wrongs. And, if you have read it or do read it, can we please talk about that ending?!?


Tell me, please!

Which series had an ending that you didn’t love but didn’t ruin the series?


 

Challenges · Uncategorized

September Sequels

I was blog hopping the other day in lieu of writing anything and Meegan Reads had mentioned this fabulous idea of focusing on sequels in September. The idea originated with Kathy at Books and Munchies and I love it!


The Rules

Post a blog post / comment / Tweet / whatever saying you’ll be joining.

Share your list of all the TBR-sequels that you own and then decide which ones to give priority to.

If you’re sharing your updates on social media, use #SequelSeptember so we can follow up on each other. Simple!


My TBR

Here is the top of my sequel TBR. I also need to finish re-reading all of the Harry Potter books for one of my 2019 challenges.


Tell me, please!

Do you have sequels that need your attention?


 

nonfiction · Uncategorized

Non-Fiction Friday: May 17, 2019 Dot Journaling, A Practical Guide by Rachel Wilkerson Miller

I have always been a paper person. Writing lists and keeping a physical calendar is the only method that keeps me organized. While my digital calendar is wonderfully sharable and does a fabulous job of checking for conflicts, I cannot seem to retain the information I put into it. I hate putting to do lists on there and wandering around with my phone out all of the time. Don’t get my started on how frustrating it is when you finish on an electronic to-do list and it just disappears. Crossing things off is the only reason to make a list in the first place! I just can’t let go of my pen and paper. Also, I j’adore office supplies.

When I first saw The Bullet Journal Method by Ryder Carrol I thought, “I love this idea.” An analog method for a digital world? Yes please! I immediately bought a notebook and special pens and tried it.

Except it was too complicated. Why do I have to number all the pages? Why am I constantly re-writing things? These analog repetitions are exactly the wonders that my phone does for me. The symbols made no sense to me. Then the gorgeous Instagram and Pinterest pages started to appear. My bullet journal looked nothing like either of these two extremes! So, I quit.

But I still wanted to be a bullet journal person. Desperately. This weekend I spotted Dot Journaling, A Practical Guide by Rachel Wilkerson Miller. The sub-title was “How to Start and Keep the Planner, To-to-list, and Diary That’ll Actually Help You Get Your Life Together.” More importantly, the intro identified the author as a fellow bullet journal wanna be who became confused and overwhelmed by the actual process. She writes for Buzzfeed and has a great little blurb about starting a bullet journal here.

dotjournalingDot Journal is the ideal starting point for people who, like me, love the pen and paper method but do not have the time, energy, or inclination to spend an hour a day copying and recopying to-do lists and calendar items. Dot Journaling also gives clear instructions on how to set-up the journal, something I still couldn’t figure out even after watching the youtube video by Ryder Carrol.

Here is how Goodreads describes the book.

 

Organize your life, record what matters, and get stuff done!

What the heck is a dot journal? It’s a planner, to-do list, anddiary for every aspect of your life: work, home, relationships, hobbies, everything.

Early adopter Rachel Wilkerson Miller explains how to make a dot journal work for you—whether you find the picture-perfect examples on Pinterest inspiring or, well, intimidating. You decide how simple or elaborate your journal will be, and what goes in there:

– Lists of your to-dos, to-don’ts, and more
– Symbols that will make those lists efficient and effective
– Spreads to plan your day, week, month, or year
– Trackers for your habits and goals (think health, money, travel)
– Accoutrements such as washi tape, book darts, and more!

Dot Journaling is only about 200 pages but still manages to give you an overview of the basics, tips, and tricks, and the details you need on how to use the “special pages.” The special pages are the ones I love – the financial planner, the book reading list and the habit trackers! This is the stuff that feeds my Instagram. The book even includes how to cope with a page that the antithesis of Insta-worthy (glue them together and pretend it never happens is my favorite).  With photos and short explanations of yearly, monthly and daily spreads as well as cute and simple examples of for special uses for your journal this book finally accomplished what countless other sources couldn’t: helping me understand this blended use journaling.

I read this book at the beginning of this week. I suppressed my first desire, to buy a brand new journal, and instead unearthed a previously purchased journal with a grand total of 15 pages used. One of the points the author makes it that it doesn’t need to be perfect. This is revolutionary to me. I need to get over the idea that every page will be a work of art. Sometimes I just need to embrace that “good enough is good enough” and let go of perfectionism. I’m honestly surprised that I was able to force myself to start in the middle of the month – it wasn’t even a Monday!

Let me tell you, the combination of to-do list, diary, and calendar make for a complete look at how my day went. Adding a short little note to each day turns what is an ordinary calendar into a keep-sake diary without the pressure of coming up with a long pontification of my typical Tuesday. No more will I look back and wonder why I got nothing accomplished all day. I’ll know I was sick because I wrote it down! And the joy of all those crossed off to-dos…

After reading Atomic Habits by James Clear I wanted to increase my positive habits and decreased my negatives ones. I also want to use Gretchen Rubin’s time tracking system to see how much time I actually have in a day. And, you know what, life is short and I don’t want to look back and wonder, “What did I accomplish?” This journaling is perfect for all of these needs. Realizing that has been like that first day of spring after a long winter. I feel powerful, organized, and positive about myself and my future. Ah, the power of paper.


Tell me, please!

Do you keep a journal? Have you tried bullet journaling? Any tips?


 

Fantasy · Middle Grade · SeriousSeriesLove · Uncategorized

Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard Trilogy: A Series Review

I have been enjoying Rick Riordan’s books since I first read The Lightning Thief almost 15 years ago. Through the years I have followed the adventures of Percy, Annabeth, and Grover and then became equally swept up by the Heroes of Olympus Series. I grew to adore Jason, Piper, and Leo! For months, I highly anticipated the first Kane Chronicles book….but that series just didn’t grab my attention. Truthfully, I wondered if perhaps I had just outgrown my love for mythology based adventures. But then I read Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard. Of all of Riordan’s books, this series is easily my favorite. Read these blurbs from each book and it will be easy to see why the action-packed Norse mythology appealed to me.

Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard, The Sword of Summer

Magnus Chase has seen his share of trouble. Ever since that terrible night two years ago when his mother told him to run, he has lived alone on the streets of Boston, surviving by his wits, staying one step ahead of the police and the truant officers.

One day, Magnus learns that someone else is trying to track him down—his uncle Randolph, a man his mother had always warned him about. When Magnus tries to outmaneuver his uncle, he falls right into his clutches. Randolph starts rambling about Norse history and Magnus’s birthright: a weapon that has been lost for thousands of years.

The more Randolph talks, the more puzzle pieces fall into place. Stories about the gods of Asgard, wolves, and Doomsday bubble up from Magnus’s memory. But he doesn’t have time to consider it all before a fire giant attacks the city, forcing him to choose between his own safety and the lives of hundreds of innocents. . . .

Sometimes, the only way to start a new life is to die.

Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard, The Hammer of Thor

“Magnus Chase, you nearly started Ragnarok. What are you going to do next?”

It’s been six weeks since Magnus and his friends returned from defeating Fenris Wolf and the fire giants. Magnus has adjusted to life at the Hotel Valhalla—as much as a once-homeless and previously alive kid can. As a son of Frey, the god of summer, fertility, and health, Magnus doesn’t exactly fit in with the rest of Odin’s chosen warriors, but he has a few good peeps among his hallmates on floor nineteen, and he’s been dutifully training for Ragnarok along with everyone else. His days have settled into a new kind of normal.

But Magnus should have known there’s no such thing as normal in the Nine Worlds. His friends Hearthstone and Blitzen have disappeared. A new hallmate is creating chaos. According to a very nervous goat, a certain object belonging to Thor is still missing, and the thunder god’s enemies will stop at nothing to gain control of it.

Time to summon Jack, the Sword of Summer, and take action. Too bad the only action Jack seems to be interested in is dates with other magical weapons. . . .

Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard, The Ship of the Dead

Magnus Chase, son of Frey, the god of summer and health, isn’t naturally inclined toward being a brave warrior. Still, with the help of his motley group of friends, he has achieved deeds he never would have thought possible. Now he faces his most dangerous trial yet.

Loki is free from his chains. He’s readying Naglfar, the Ship of the Dead, complete with a host of giants and zombies, to sail against the Asgardian gods and begin the final battle of Ragnarok. It’s up to Magnus and his friends to stop him, but to do so they will have to sail across the oceans of Midgard, Jotunheim, and Niflheim in a desperate race to reach Naglfarbefore it’s ready to sail. Along the way, they will face angry sea gods, hostile giants, and an evil fire-breathing dragon. But Magnus’s biggest challenge will be facing his own inner demons. Does he have what it takes to outwit the wily trickster god?

Beyond the fantastic storytelling and action Riordan has put together an all-star cast of diverse characters that everyone dreams of having as friends.

Magnus Chase himself is not the son of a powerful god. Rather he is the son of Frey, god of summer and health. He is the epitome of that healing character we all want on our journeys but no one actually wants to play. By making him the main character and the protagonist in this series, Riordan has put forward a powerful statement about the different kinds of strength we all need to succeed.

Then there is Samirah al Abbas. Not only is Sam a Valkyrie while still in high school, she is also the daughter of Loki and a devout Muslim. Her unwaivering allegiance to her family and her faith reminds me of growing up in an equally devout Irish Catholic family.

Blitzen the Dwarf is a talented tailor who cares almost as much about his appearance as he does his best friend, Hearthstone the Elf. Hearthstone is Deaf and together these two adopt Magnus when he is first homeless in Boston. It is here that I believe the diversity in this series really shined because Hearthstone’s Deafness is not talked about as a disability but just one aspect of him. Everyone uses American Sign Language around Hearthstone and the culture and history of Deaf people has clearly been researched and explored by the author.

In book two we meet Alex Fierro who is also a child of Loki and is gender fluid. Like Hearthstone this aspect of Alex’s person is talked about, accepted for what it is, and just becomes woven into the story.

Halfborn Gunderson, Thomas Jefferson, Jr, and Mallory Keen all live on Magnus’s floor in in Hotel Valhalla. Along with Frey, Loki, Thor and the Sword of Summer (a.k.a. Jack) the books have an enviable cast of characters. I only wished I had peeked at these wonderful drawings of the characters before I had read the books – they are better than I imagined them!

This is a middle grade book just like Riordan’s other series. But this is the first of his that feels like it was cast from an actual sampling of people living in the world. I would love for parents and teachers to read this book with their students or children and have an open discussion about the wonderful differences that exist between people and how, in the end, we are much more the same because of our shared experiences. I highly recommend this series!


Tell me, please!

Have you read this series? If not, which book do you love for its diverse characters?


Readathon · Uncategorized

2019 OWLs Readathon Results

Happy May 1st! I find it fitting that today is locally Law Day since I worked all last month to try and take enough OWLs to qualify for a cushy Ministry of Magic job in the legal department. Now, I tried to make a plan at the beginning of April. Here were my goals:

Charms (Age-line: read an adult book): The Extraordinary Adventures of Alfred Kropp by Rick Yancey

Defense Against the Dark Arts (Reducto: Title Starts With an “R”): RoseBlood by A.G. Howard

History of Magic (Published at Least 10 Years Ago): Hamlet by William Shakespeare

Potions (Next Ingredient: Sequel): Arch Enemy by Frank Beddor

Transfiguration (Prayed Edges or Red Cover): Eon by Alison Goodman

Muggle Studies (Contemporary): Blue Lily: Lily Blue by Maggie Stiefvater.


Half-way through the month it was clear that I wasn’t doing well sticking precisely to my reading list and I just gave in and went with the books that called to me. Thankfully, I read enough variety that I made it! I have come to the realization that as much as I want to think of myself as a Hermione, it turns out I am more of a Ron. If I reviewed the book, the link is in the title.

Charms (Age-line: read an adult book)Meet Cute by Helena Hunting, Last of the Summer Moet by Wendy Holden and Highland Crown by Mary McGoldrick.

Defense Against the Dark Arts (Reducto: Title Starts With an “R”): Red Rising, Sons of Ares by Pierce Brown

History of Magic (Published at Least 10 Years Ago): Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett

Potions (Next Ingredient: Sequel): Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard, The Hammer of Thor by Rick Riordan.

Transfiguration (Prayed Edges or Red Cover): Eon by Alison Goodman

Muggle Studies (Contemporary): Blue Lily: Lily Blue, by Maggie Stiefvater.

In the end, I read so many more books in April than I would have because of this delightful readathon. I have never participated in a readathon that was this well designed or had so much work and love clearly poured into it. If you get a chance, make sure and check out Book Riot’s channel on Youtube and follow all the Harry Potter love on Twitter – this woman deserves and award (and a vacation)!


Tell me, please!

What is the best readathon you have ever participated in? Why?


 

Readathon · Uncategorized

2019 OWL Readathon Reading List

I realize that I am a day late in getting my reading list out but this was just TOO MUCH FUN to put together. After looking at my lame first quarter of reading I knew I needed a swift kick to the pants and so I went where all great minds seem to find inspiration lately – Twitter. There I witnessed burning excitement about this OWL Readathon and for good reason. G @ Book Roast has put together a truly magnificent program and I am so excited to participate! Make sure and check it out because even if you don’t have time to participate we all have time to admire the workmanship that has gone into setting this up. The O.W.Ls will take place during April and the N.E.W.Ts can be done during August!

The best part of this whole thing is that all of my picks are off my massive physical TBR!


Step One: Pick a Career!

This one took me forever but I finally have settled on working for the Ministry of Magic. I would like to be in the Department of Magical Law Enforcement. It may sound boring to but I love rules and regulations and, frankly, I love working in a collaborative office atmosphere. Realistically, this is probably most like my day job too but with magic. Ministry work requires:

Screen Shot 2019-04-02 at 9.08.48 AM

And, if I want to actually work in the Department of Magical Law Enforcement I need to do a little more work:

Screen Shot 2019-04-02 at 9.09.35 AM


Step Two: What Books Will Fulfill My O.W.L Requirements?

owls-prompts

Charms (Age-line: read an adult book): The Extraordinary Adventures of Alfred Kropp by Rick Yancey

Defense Against the Dark Arts (Reducto: Title Starts With an “R”): RoseBlood by A.G. Howard

History of Magic (Published at Least 10 Years Ago): Hamlet by William Shakespeare

Potions (Next Ingredient: Sequel): Arch Enemy by Frank Beddor

Transfiguration (Prayed Edges or Red Cover): Eon by Alison Goodman

Muggle Studies (Contemporary): Blue Lily: Lily Blue by Maggie Stiefvater.


And, in the off chance that I have extra time (or I change my career path), I have selected books for the other categories.

Ancient Runes (Retelling): Scarlet by A.C. Vaughn

Arithmancy (Work Written by More Than One Author): Of Two Minds by Carol Matas and Perry Nodelman

Astronomy (“Star” in the Title): Catching Stars by Kayla Keenan

Care of Magical Creatures (Land Animal on the Cover): Shadow and Fox by Julie Kagawa – I realize that this is a mask of a fox but I am hoping that is enough!

Divination (Set in Future): William Shakespeare’s Star Wars.

Herbology (Plant on Cover): The Price Guide to the Occult by Leslie Walton


Tell me, please!

Are you participating in this Readathon?