Social Saturday

Social Saturday: March 22, 2020

At the beginning of the year I vowed to make Saturdays more social. With so many of us in quarantine, lockdown, practicing social distancing, or just staying in to avoid COVID19, any socializing feels essential. You are always welcome to join and I have made it as simple as possible. You can either comment below or link up a post of your own answering two big questions.

How are your 2020 reading challenges this week? 

What are some of your favorite posts from this week?

READING CHALLENGES


Start on Your Shelfathon from The Quiet Pond.

startonyourshelfathon

This week? HAH! I haven’t updated this in forever. Here are my books from February AND March.

The Toll by Neil Shusterman

The Philosopher’s Flight by Tom Miller

Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything by Lydia Kang, MD and Nate Pedersen

These three lonely little books are kind of a pathetic considering I have added more than 20 to my physical shelf. I need to actually start on my shelf!


Challenge: Beat the Backlist from Novel Knight

BeatTheBacklist2020_Banner-scaled

Nothing! Well, that is not entirely true. Many of my audiobooks are from my backlist because they are easier to pick up from my library than physical books. But, this year I am trying not to double count books. Still, if this continues I reserve the right to change my mind on this.


Challenge: Audiobook Challenge – Caffeinated Reader & Hot Listens

Audiobook-Challenge-2020

Me by Elton John

The Alchemyst by Michael Scott

The Greatest Love Story Ever Told by Nick Offerman and Megan Mullally

The Zookeeper’s Wife by Diane Ackerman

Cary Grant: A Class Apart by Graham McCann


MY FAVORITE POSTS FROM THIS WEEK

Simply Sherri posted for PopCultureUncovered.com about all of the new releases that will be available to rent or those going directly to streaming services during the COVID19 crisis.

If you are looking for something different to do while at home, there is a poetry competition that is fully explained on The Nerdy Book Club.

BookerTalk has a great list of technology solutions for staying inside during this time. From audiobooks to online learning, there are some really fun resources here!

Speaking of audible and audiobooks, Hashanti has dived deeply into them! You can read the post here about the audible books Hashanti has been enjoying and, perhaps, find something new for yourself.

Finally, I am pretty inspired by Liz’s Stay at Home Club. I just love this idea and, if I can get organized enough, maybe I will even start one myself!


Tell me, please!

How are you being social today? Everyone okay out there?


 

 

WWW Wednesday

WWW Wednesday: March 18, 2020

Even in the middle of a pandemic, I can count on WWW Wednesday to ground me. Here in Chicago we are practicing social distancing, but judging by the way many in my city are taking this advice we will be quarantined like Italy in no time. St. Patrick’s Day brought out the ridiculous, I swear. I’m thankfully for numerous things at this time but I’m especially grateful for this meme for bringing me back to my blog and for all the participants for making sure I never run out of bookish conversation and books.

My favorite meme was last hosted by MizB at A Daily Rhythm and has found a new home with Sam @ Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. Don’t forget to check all the other participants. It is the #1 way I keep my TBR overflowing!


The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?


WHAT AM I CURRENTLY READING?

Sooooo, poison and romance. Perfect for these trying times! I am either filled to the brim with love and concern for my friends and family or I am pondering the quickest way to make them quiet down and leave me to read in peace.

The Weed that Strings the Hangman’s Bag by Alan Bradley is the second in the Flavia de Luce series and I am consuming it like a bag of my favorite chips. Flavia has lost none of her appeal and the mystery has been keeping me company at night on my faithful Ken (my kindle).

My audiobook this week is still Emma. Like most people, I have lost the commute time that I usually dedicate to audiobooks and there is only so much vacuuming a person can do. I need to find another time to make it “audiobook” time.

I am more than half way through Quackery and this book is awesome. I love the dark humor and the historical look at medicines attempts to keep us alive. Bonus: I have learned the basis for the both sayings, “Blow smoke up my ass” and “like a hole in my head.”

Finally, I started the second Austenland book, Midnight at Austenland by Shannon Hale. The first one was made into a movie and I am absolutely adoring this second book. She said on twitter that she has two more outlined and I can only hope that her children allow her the time and energy to write them during this crisis.


WHAT DID I RECENTLY FINISH?

Nothing! I feel like I have been in stasis since last Wednesday. If I hadn’t already scheduled a post for Cary Grant: A Class Apart nothing new would be on the blog at all.


WHAT WILL I READ NEXT?

When the COVID virus started to look truly serious I did what any sane person would do – I ordered a few extra books. Never mind that I already have FOUR shelves of unread books, I needed a few more to stockpile! I don’t know what my fascination with poison is but here is a peak at my immediate TBR shelf.

So, I have Poison, Tap Dancing, and Picard. I think it is pretty clear that I am not struggling with my social distancing.


Tell me, please!

Everyone okay out there? (And what’s on your WWW?)


 

Audio Book · nonfiction

Nonfiction Friday: Cary Grant, A Class Apart by Graham McCann

Graham McCann’s autobiography of Cary Grant carries the reader through his life from birth to death with intimate looks at every stage. I have loved Cary Grant since the first time I laid eyes on him and this book did nothing to shake that love.


SYNOPSIS

A biography narrating how the English working-class boy Archie Leach transformed himself into the actor Cary Grant and a role model of elegance and class for the socially ambitious around the world. from Amazon.


carygrant


REVIEW

This is, quite possibly, the shortest synopsis I have ever seen for a book. Understandably so, since few people are ignorant of Cary Grant’s existence or his lasting impact on the silver screen. Take, for example, this classic bit.

An interview with a Two Hour Old Baby

Interviewer: Do you know the important people in the world today?

Two Hour Old Baby: Well, some. I don’t know, I’m not sure.

Interviewer: You don’t know what you know?

Two Hour Old Baby: No.

Interviewer: Do you know, for instance, Mickey Mouse?

Two Hour Old Baby: No.

Interviewer: Queen Elizabeth?

Two Hour Old Baby: No.

Interviewer: Winston Churchill?

Two Hour Old Baby: Ah, no,

Interviewer: Fidel Castro?

Two Hour Old Baby? No.

Interviewer: Pandit Nehru?

Two Hour Old Baby: No.

Interviewer: Have you heard of Cary Grant?

Two Hour Old Baby: Oh, sure! Everybody knows Cary Grant!

Carl Reiner and Mel Brooks, “The Two Hour Old Baby” from Cary Grant, A Class Apart.

Before reading this book I felt the same as the Two Hour Baby. That I knew Cary Grant. After all, I possessed the knowledge that Cary Grant was born Archie Leach, that he had a strange relationship with his Mother, and that he made an enormous number of movies. I even knew about his solo front top tooth. Look at me – I’m a massive fan! Blah. I knew nothing.

Cary Grant was indeed born Archie Leach. But, he didn’t change his name until he was 27. That is a longtime to inhabit one name only to become intertwined with another. Which makes it all the more understandable that Grant frequently referred to Archie in real life and in movies.

A “strange relationship with his Mother”? That is the understatement of the year for me! Grant’s Mother was committed to an asylum when he was a child. She was home one day and gone the next. Grant was told she was going to a resort to rest and, at one point, he was told that she had died. Really, his father just wanted her out of the way so he could start a new life with his current mistress. Only after his Father’s death did the payments to the asylum stop and Grant found out his Mother was still alive. She disappeared when he was 11 and he discovered her again at 30.

Furthermore, I think I have seen 15-20 of Grant’s films. That isn’t even half of the SEVENTY-TWO films he made in his lifetime. I was just blown away by the sheer number of films. I am nearly as impressed by the number as I am by the fact that when Grant declared himself retired he actually retired.

This book is full of such interesting tidbits and information that the hours listening to it passed too quickly. The more I learned about Grant the more I realized I actually understood the most important thing: the magic of Cary Grant. Cary Grant was, and will probably remain forever, the master of making everyone feel that they knew and liked him through his movies. Whether a movie did well or not, Grant remained unscathed. It just took a moment, a small tug at the corner of his mouth, or the twinkle in his eye, to hook you. And once he did, it was forever.

Considering this magical quality, it would be difficult to write about someone like Cary Grant and not fall in love with him. McCann might be accused of this, but who wouldn’t be? Still, the biography feels balanced and fact-based in contrast to some that have been published before and have relied heavily on gossip and conjecture. In the end, I became just a little more infatuated with the actor. Which, if I were being honest, I didn’t think was possible.


Tell me, please!

Have you ever been a fan of someone’s work only to discover there was so much you didn’t know about them?


 

WWW Wednesday

WWW Wednesday: March 11, 2020

Welcome to WWW Wednesday! My favorite meme was last hosted by MizB at A Daily Rhythm and has found a new home with Sam @ Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. Don’t forget to check all the other participants. It is the #1 way I keep my TBR overflowing!


The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?


WHAT AM I CURRENTLY READING?

The delightful pairing of Quackery and the second Flavia de Luce mystery has made my week full to the brim of smart humor and poison. Quackery is much funnier than I thought it would be and I am becoming, once again, insufferable in sharing tidbits of information to everyone. And, as you’ll see below, I have become a huge fan of Alan Bradley’s books.

Also, I watched the new Emma movie last week and enjoyed it so much that I immediately borrowed and audiobook from the library. I am already 30% of the way in and loving it. For someone who professed to be uninterested in Jane Austen for so long I am quickly shaping up to be a massive fan.


WHAT DID I RECENTLY FINISH?

While I didn’t get any posts up this week, I did have a great week of reading. I finished the first Flavia de Luce mystery, Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie. This adult mystery features the brilliant and incorrigible 11-year old Flavia and I loved every single page. Clearly, since I couldn’t wait even two minutes before jumping into book two. Review soon!

I picked up The Duff after watching the movie. Unfortunately, the movie did a lot of improving on this story and I didn’t enjoy the book much at all.

The Dark Lord Clementine was great fun! This middle grade fantasy features Clementine, the daughter of the Dark Lord, who is trying to hold their castle together when her father is cursed. A sweet adventure about self-discovery and finding your place in the world and in your home. A full review will be coming soon!

Finally, I finished listening to Cary Grant, A Class Apart. Graham McCann’s autobiography of Cary Grant carries the reader through his life from birth to death with intimate looks at every stage. I have loved Cary Grant since the first time I laid eyes on him and this book did nothing to shake that love. You guessed it – full review soon!


WHAT WILL I READ NEXT?

I received Picard as a gift this month and I am barely restraining myself from starting it so I know it will be next. I also want to continue my Austen parade and I have Persuasion on my physical TBR. But, all of this might be changed when I finally work out my TBR for the 2020 Magical Readathon. I cannot wait to participate again this year!


Tell me, please!

What is on your WWW?


 

WWW Wednesday

WWW Wednesday: March 4, 2020

Welcome to WWW Wednesday! My favorite meme was last hosted by MizB at A Daily Rhythm and has found a new home with Sam @ Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. Don’t forget to check all the other participants. It is the #1 way I keep my TBR overflowing!


The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?


WHAT AM I CURRENTLY READING?

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday: Books With Single-Word Titles

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme is hosted by Jana from That Artsy Reader Girl . There are lots of Top Ten Tuesdays posts that I love to read but I only occasionally prepared (organized enough) to join. This is mostly because I am fairly terrible at remembering the full titles to books. But, this one, suggested by Kitty at Kitty Marie’s Reading corner is perfect for me since I always remember the full title when there is only one word. Here are a few of my favorite single-word titles.


 

In no particular order and the links will take you to a full review if you are interested:

Me by Elton John

Guts by Raina Telgemeier

Illuminae, Gemina, and Obsidio (The Illuninae Files) by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

Circe by Madeline Miller

Canada by Mike Myers

Bob by Wendy Mass and Rebecca Stead

Angelmaker by Nick Harkaway

Echo by Pam Munoz Ryan

Austenland by Shannon Hale


I would like to give honorable mention to the following nonfiction books that appear to have a one word title but are really long-winded wonderful things instead.

Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle by Emily Nagoski and Amelia Nagoski

Snacks: A Canadian Food History by Janis Thiessen

Factfulness: Ten Reasons We’re Wrong About the World and Why Things Are Better Than You Think by Hans Roslin, Anna Roslin Ronnlund, and Ola Rosling


Tell me, please!

What’s Your Favorite Single-Word Title?


 

not a review

2020 Books in Two Sentences: February Edition

At the very beginning of 2020 I saw The Knight is Dark and Full of Books do this with their 2019 books and I was in awe. I knew I wanted to do the same for my 2020 books but I also knew that if I didn’t make it a monthly habit it would be a hot mess at the end of the year. I may be doing slightly better getting February’s list out than January’s but, as you can see, it was a rough month for keeping up with my reviews. Onward to a better March! The solo link will take you to the one lonely full review.

Best Friends (Real Friends, #2) by Shannon Hale: The second in this graphic novel series highlights the ever-changing landscape of middle-school friendships. You don’t need to be 10-13 to fall in love with this story.

Fake Blood by Whitney Gardner: An adorable look at the weird depths kids will go to to become closer to people they admire. I read it and loved it, read it again and loved it even more!

Snoopy: First Beagle in Space by Charles M. Schulz: A collection of Snoopy comics about the beloved characters and their dreams of space travel. It wasn’t my favorite book of the month but I enjoyed the highlighting of the less-popular characters.

The Zookeepers Wife by Diane Ackerman: A beautiful look at the day to day hardships endured by those who lived in Poland during the outbreak of WWII. It is still amazing the lengths people will go to in order to become the very worst, and the very best, versions of themselves.

The Plus One by Sarah Archer: A contemporary romance that gives us a female protagonist smart enough to build a humanoid robot in one weekend but not self-aware enough to communicate with anyone around her. This book missed my heart by miles.

Anne of Green Gables (Anne of Green Gables, #1) by L.M. Montgomery. This literary classic may have some historic racism and other issues but Anne herself is timeless. I have finally joined the ranks of people who just adore her!

Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle by Emily Nagoski and Amelia Nagoski: For a term I had never heard of before, “Burnout” is my new go-term term for being at the edge of insanity. This engaging and insightful book is a must read for women everywhere who are just about to give up.

I Hate Fairyland, Vol, 1: Madly Ever After by Skittie Young: What a violent weird graphic novel. I cannot wait to get my hands on the second one.

The Last Tsar’s Dragon by Jane Yolen and Adam Stemple: This book spend the first 80% introducing us to the cast of characters who will presumable move the story along in the next books but failed to capture my interest. If you are interested in Romanov history and dragons, this might be for you!

Austenland (Austenland #1) by Shannon Hale: I’ve watched the move countless times but I didn’t realize it was based on a book! Hale co-wrote the script and the stories follow closely but even the beautiful speeches made by the gorgeous Henry couldn’t overcome the loss of Jennifer Coolidge’s character.


Tell me, please!

How was your February reading?


 

nonfiction

Nonfiction Friday: Burnout, The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle by Emily Nagoski and Amelia Nagoski

For a term I had never heard of before, “Burnout” is my new go-term term for being at the edge of insanity. This engaging and insightful book is a must read for women everywhere who are just about to give up.


SYNOPSIS

Burnout. Many women in America have experienced it. What’s expected of women and what it’s really like to be a woman in today’s world are two very different things—and women exhaust themselves trying to close the gap between them. How can you “love your body” when every magazine cover has ten diet tips for becoming “your best self”? How do you “lean in” at work when you’re already operating at 110 percent and aren’t recognized for it? How can you live happily and healthily in a sexist world that is constantly telling you you’re too fat, too needy, too noisy, and too selfish?

Sisters Emily Nagoski, PhD, and Amelia Nagoski, DMA, are here to help end the cycle of feeling overwhelmed and exhausted. Instead of asking us to ignore the very real obstacles and societal pressures that stand between women and well-being, they explain with compassion and optimism what we’re up against—and show us how to fight back. In these pages you’ll learn

• what you can do to complete the biological stress cycle—and return your body to a state of relaxation
• how to manage the “monitor” in your brain that regulates the emotion of frustration
• how the Bikini Industrial Complex makes it difficult for women to love their bodies—and how to defend yourself against it
• why rest, human connection, and befriending your inner critic are keys to recovering and preventing burnout

With the help of eye-opening science, prescriptive advice, and helpful worksheets and exercises, all women will find something transformative in these pages—and will be empowered to create positive change. Emily and Amelia aren’t here to preach the broad platitudes of expensive self-care or insist that we strive for the impossible goal of “having it all.” Instead, they tell us that we are enough, just as we are—and that wellness, true wellness, is within our reach. from Amazon.


burnout
“Burnout” Pink Cover with ripped page

REVIEW

Burnout is defined in this book by three components: (1) emotional exhaustion – the fatigue that comes from caring too much, for too long; (2) depersonalization – the depletion of empathy, caring, and compassion; and (3) decreased sense of accomplishment – an unconquerable sense of futility; feeling that nothin you do makes any difference.

Upon first reading this, I felt I’d been spotted. There must be cracks in my facade!

But I am in good company. According to the authors, “burnout” is a phenomena affecting whole groups of people who work in positions of, “people helping people.” Teachers, medical professionals, humanitarian aid workers, and parents are all suffering from burnout in large numbers. Oddly, women are more deeply and specifically impacted.

Now, as a die-heard feminist I like to believe that men are just as susceptible to things as women are capable. However, in this case, I have to agree with the authors. As they walk the reader through historic gender problems, most specifically “human giver syndrome,” it is difficult to argue that differing treatment in childhood wouldn’t have some impact. I can accept that women who are raised to believe that being thin is good and looking pretty is important will result in burnout just as easily as toxic masculinity has roots in “boys will be boys” and “real men don’t cry.”

Be nice, be strong, be polite. No feelings for you

The chapters are broken down into manageable chunks of pertinent information. It was clear to me that the authors had taught because each chapter laid the foundation for the one before it and built on the prior. And, for those who need reminders or who are too busy to read the details they provided a Too Long Didn’t Read (TLDR) at the end of each chapter. By using personal anecdotes, stories from friends, and those from popular fiction, the book was as fun to read as it was informative. Although, I could have done with a lot less Moana references (but that’s just me!).

Chapters one and two clearly lay out what is causing stress in most women’s lives and how to deal with it. Some of the information was new to me but the fact that really stunned me was the notion that our bodies need to get rid of stress. Whether that it through exercise, affection, or even creative measures, we are biologically programmed to need that outlet. Sounds simple enough but they way they explained it resonated with me so deeply I have completely transformed the way I work out and how I prioritize sleep.

Things were a little less solid for me in certain sections. For example, chapter three was about meaning, as in the meaning of life. While your life having “meaning” is one of the main elements that promotes happiness finding your “Something Larger” is important for feeling that your life has a positive impact. Initially I struggled with this section because how can you have “something larger” and avoid falling victim to “human giver syndrome?” But, I suppose being a stay-at-home Mom because you want to be is entirely different than being one because society limits you to that role. Similarly, I can make monetary sacrificing in my career if I want to do that kind of work as long as I am not limited to my choice of jobs by what is appropriate for a woman.

The remainder of the book explains why what sounds simply is so difficult for women. From acknowledging that the game is rigged, fighting the patriarchy, and gaslighting, being a women is fundamentally difficult. And if you don’t get a chance to read the book just know this fact,

“The body mass index (BMI) chart and it labels – underweight, overweight, obese, etc. – were created by a panel of nine individuals, seven of whom were ’employed by weight-loss clinics and thus have an economic interest in encouraging use of their facilities.'”

For every woman out there who is feeling crushed under the weight of the world, this book really helped me. I used to look around at my male friends and wonder, “Why are they so carefree, what’s wrong with me?” There is nothing wrong with me. I was just experiencing burnout.


Tell me, please!

Do you ever feel uniquely stressed?


 

WWW Wednesday

WWW Wednesday: February 26, 2020

Welcome to WWW Wednesday! My favorite meme was last hosted by MizB at A Daily Rhythm and has found a new home with Sam @ Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. Don’t forget to check all the other participants. It is the #1 way I keep my TBR overflowing!


The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?


WHAT AM I CURRENTLY READING?

 

This week is all new! I cracked into How to be a Lady in audiobook format mostly to mock it. I am not ashamed to admit that I was wrong. This book is full to the brim of sensible advice on how to be considerable, kind, and thoughtful. It does say the word “Lady” far too frequently and is like listening to a list being read. Still, I am left really thinking long and hard about how wonderful our world would be if we all agreed on a set pattern of social expectations.

I also started The Dark Lord Clementine by Sarah Jean Horwitz. This middle grade book stars Clementine. Her dad, The Dark Lord, has been cursed. Will Clementine be able to save him? Or, will she have to take over Dark Lord duties?

Finally, I started reading The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley. This, the first of the Flavia de Luce mysteries, is my March bookclub pick.


WHAT DID I RECENTLY FINISH READING?

austenland

I picked up and finished Austenland by Shannon Hale this week. I have been a big fan of Hale and the movie but I never realized that there was a book! What JOY! She had a major part in writing the screenplay so, as suspected, the book was very close to the movie. However, I don’t think anything can compare to Jennifer Coolidge. Movie wins!


WHAT WILL I READ NEXT?

 

I picked up the second in the Austenland series and I plan to start that next. However, I also need some nonfiction in my life so I think I will start Quakery which looks like a fun one.


Tell me, please!

What’s on your WWW?


 

Audio Book · nonfiction

The Greatest Love Story Ever Told: An Oral History by Nick Offerman and Megan Mullally

This audiobook version of Nick Offerman and Megan Mullally’s book was like listening to the two of them over a long dinner. Listening to them flirt, chat, compliment, and reminisce will show even the hardest heart what a beautiful marriage can look like.


SYNOPSIS

At last, the full story behind Megan Mullally and Nick Offerman’s epic romance, including stories, portraits, and the occasional puzzle, all telling the smoldering tale that has fascinated Hollywood for over a decade.

The year: 2000. The setting: Los Angeles. A gorgeous virtuoso of an actress had agreed to star in a random play, and a basement-dwelling scenic carpenter had said he would assay a supporting role in the selfsame pageant. At the first rehearsal, she surveyed her fellow cast members, as one does, determining if any of the men might qualify to provide her with a satisfying fling. Her gaze fell upon the carpenter, and like a bolt of lightning, the thought struck her: No dice. Moving on.

Yet, unbeknownst to our protagonists, Cupid had merely set down his bow and picked up a rocket launcher. Then fired a love rocket (not a euphemism). The players were Megan Mullally and Nick Offerman, and the resulting romance, once it ignited, was… epic. Beyond epic. It resulted in a coupling that has endured to this day; a sizzling, perpetual tryst that has captivated the world with its kindness, athleticism, astonishingly low-brow humor, and true (fire emoji) passion.

How did they do it? They came from completely different families, endured a significant age difference, and were separated by the gulf of several social strata. Megan loved books and art history; Nick loved hammers. But much more than these seemingly unsurpassable obstacles were the values they held in common: respect, decency, the ability to mention genitalia in almost any context, and an abiding obsession with the songs of Tom Waits.

Eighteen years later, they’re still very much in love, and have finally decided to reveal the philosophical mountains they have conquered, the lessons they’ve learned, and the myriad jigsaw puzzles they’ve completed, in an audiobook. Featuring anecdotes, hijinks, interviews, photos, and a veritable grab bag of tomfoolery, this is not only the intoxicating audiobook that Mullally’s and Offerman’s fans have been waiting for, it might just hold the solution to the greatest threat facing our modern world: the single life. from Amazon


thegreatestlovestory
“The Greatest Love Story Ever Told” Nick Offerman and Megan Mullally sit together surrounded by pink roses.

REVIEW

After I finished listening to Yes, Please by Amy Poehler I watched all of Parks and Rec and became fairly obsessed with Nick Offerman’s character Ron. I think somewhere in the back of my mind I knew that he was married to Megan Mullally but, honestly, I didn’t really give it much thought. That is, until I saw Ron and Tammy on Parks and Rec. Ron and Tammy are hilarious. So, obviously, when this audiobook came across my path I decided to pick it up. This is five and a half hours of joyful and insightful listening!

Now, I’ve got to say, Nick and Megan are not afraid to talk about sex. So, if dirty jokes and not-veiled remarks about their sex life lies outside of your comfort zone just know that this book is pretty rife with them.

This book is certain to make people jealous of their happy marriage but not me. Instead, I was so thrilled to hear that this kind of love exists. I am sure that they fight (they do touch on several arguments) but they have the kind of relationship that seems built to last, one with shared interests and mutual respect for their solo projects.

What I was envious instead of Nick and Megan’s vocabulary. I have a fairly good grasp of the English language and I had to pause the audiobook SEVEN times to rewind and look up a word.

If you are stuck in dating hell, this book has some solid advice on how to find a significant other: do your own thing, be nice, and say yes to opportunities. I’m summarizing here and it is absolutely worth a listen but that is the gist. Dating sites, set ups, and bar hopping may work for some people, but it is easier to just keep moving your life forward and your eyes open. Also, it seems, being super confident in yourself might help.

Whether you pick up this audiobook for the humor, the romance, or just to listen to the witty and melodious banter of these two you will not be disappointed!


Tell me, please!

Do you enjoy celebrity memoirs?