Classic · Fantasy

The Last Unicorn by Peter S. Beagle

lastunicornThe Last Unicorn by Peter S. Beagle is classic fantasy reading on par with The Once and Future King. Here, Beagle tells the tale of a unicorn who lives in the safety of her lilac forest. Death and age cannot touch her and so she has lived a peaceful life since before memory began. But now, she hears whispers that she is the last of her kind. And so she ventures of the safety of her home to find others. Along the way she meets those who would do her harm and two who vow to aid her: the ridiculously inept magician Schmendrick and the unyielding and stalwart Molly Grue. Will the trio be enough to confront the creature that seeks to drive her kind to extinction?

I struggled for the first few chapters of The Last Unicorn. This is most likely because I have become accustomed to the fast pace and immediate action of current YA writing. However, even a measly three chapters into the story and you will know the most important aspects of the tale. More importantly, you will have met the delightful Schmendrick. Soon, Molly Grue joins the journey and, truthfully, I loved the book because I adored these two supporting characters. The unicorn struck me as insipid, but necessary, while Molly and Schmendrick were akin to Inigo and Fezek.

There is an often quoted saying regarding friendship, “Sometimes people come into your life for a moment, a day, or a lifetime. It matters not the time they spent with you but how they impacted your life in that time.” Peter S. Beagle captured the essence of this saying in this wonderful classic story.


Tell me, please!

Have you read this story?

Am I the only person that erroneously thought this was the basis for the Tom Cruise movie Legend?


Classic · fiction

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

This book has been on my radar for years. I was never assigned it in high school or college but everyone I knew had read it and found it to be profound. I have picked up copies at library books sales through the years (two to be exact) but it took listening to the audiobook version to finally experience this amazing classic book.

fahrenheit451Guy Montag lives in a world ruled by screens. His wife, Mildred is happy to be entertained by her screen “family” who live on three of the four walls of her parlor room walls. And Guy has a prestigious job as a firefighter. Except the fireman of Bradbury’s world are not needed to put out fires. Rather, they are assigned to start them. Firemen are tasked with burning the most illegal of all substances – books.

I cannot stop thinking about the world Bradbury describes. Certainly, a world ruled by screens probably seemed like a futuristic nightmare when Bradbury wrote Fahrenheit 451 in the 1940s. But, as I sit here typing on a laptop while watching on-demand television and texting with friends, it is clear that in 2018 our reliance on screens is a reality few of us can deny.

Certainly all book lovers know people who scoff at our book collection. We have smart, kind, intelligent people who say with pride, “I never read.” Our hearts break. We are confused. How could a person not understand the importance of books?

In Montag’s world reading books is not just scoffed at, it is illegal. And as I finished the story I couldn’t help but wonder, how far is the distance between scoffing at books and burning them? Because, after all, “You can’t make someone change their mind.”


Tell me, please!

Have you read Fahrenheit 451? Are you intrigued? I want to hear your thoughts!